where he works

I've decided to add to this blog every weekend. On an empty Saturday, I can curl up in my favorite itchy green sweater and stroke the sweet kitty in my lap. I can tap out the words that fill my mind till they overflow. 

When we woke this morning, snow was falling quietly in huge heaps. Bundling up in coats and hats, Charlie and I drove to his work place to use the table saw in the shop. As a Valentine's gift, he is building me a doll house model of the yurt we are going to live in someday. Measurements have been calculated and recalculated. Now, it is time for the fun stuff like figuring out where our kitchen will be and whether we will have a loft or a private addition. 

While Charlie makes a big racket with the table saw, I explore the environmental institute where he works. Following someone's fresh snowshoe tracks, I cross a foot bridge and arrive at the office building. It's a cute, homey building with houseplants in the windows and piles of rubber boots by the door. Charlie's desk is messy with field guides and scribbled notes. A snarling, stuffed raccoon sits in the corner of his office area which makes me laugh. It's a funny thing to have on a desk, and it reminds me of the fat raccoon we hit with our car last summer. I study the books and papers and gadgets Charlie has collected around his computer. His disheveled, outdoorsy life makes me fall in love with him all over again. His passion for nature is something I deeply admire. 

For the rest of the afternoon, Charlie and I fight over the space heater in the shop. Even though my boots are fur lined, my feet become numb with the cold. Charlie's fingers are red and dry from working. Finally, we decide pack up and drive home to eat dinner and drink hot chocolate and watch Netflix. Mosi sleeps at our feet and we are tucked away so happy and warm. We have it so good in this snowy wonderland called Moscow. 

Of course, Life isn't always snug and cozy. This Monday I have a dentist appointment I'm not looking forward to :) Every Sunday evening we carry our dirty laundry across the courtyard to the laundry room. Long work weeks bog us down and drain our minds. I'm still getting used to a regimented office job with scheduled lunch breaks. Every evening and weekend I have to force myself to create and seek adventure - or my camera will sit on the shelf collecting dust and our car will stay in the driveway. Sometimes, I dream of a carefree life, where I take photos for a living and Charlie keeps our farm running. A life that still leaves us drained and exhausted, but in the most wonderful and fulfilling way. 

Until then I am content. Content with being gloriously poor and rich at the same time. 

moscow idaho
moscow idaho
moscow idaho
charlie herrick
laurel herrick
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idaho-5.jpg
idaho-12.jpg

the handmade summer

     While Charlie has been fishing out on the lake, I’ve been exploring the world of natural dyeing. I was scrolling through Instagram last week when I accidentally discovered some beautiful accounts: @danceypantsdisco @oldjoy @homesweethomestead and @growingwildthings. These accounts are run by young women/mothers who live such beautiful lives with their families. Most of them live on a homestead of some sort. They garden, raise chickens and sheep, knit sweaters, dye fabric for handmade clothing and teach their children to love the outdoors. These women have inspired me to build a similar life for Charlie and me; in fact we’ve talked about our own future homestead quite often. Charlie wants to build a greenhouse and I want to make things in my beautiful kitchen. We both dream of the day we can be (mostly) self-sufficient. That’s why I decided to start natural dyeing. Not only is it a joy to forage for plants and experiment with colors, but I’m one step closer to making our own clothing and quilts.

            After a little bit of research, I drove to town and purchased the materials for dyeing – fabric, stock pots, rubber gloves and alum. Then I rolled up my sleeves and set to work soaking the fabric, boiling my plant materials, dissolving the alum, stirring the clean white cotton into dye pots. The whole process took two or three days – it was a real test to my patience – but everything paid off. My fabric turned out beautifully. And now I’m hooked. Sometimes I feel like Rose and Topaz from “I Capture the Castle” who decided to dye everything in their house, from the curtains to their socks.           

            Another (smaller) project I’ve been working on has been making yucca shampoo. Yucca has been my very favorite plant for a long time! I’ve always loved the milky white flowers and waxy leaves. When I was little, my mother read me a book about white yucca moths flying from plant to plant in the silvery moonlight. She told me how the plants need the moths to be pollinated and the moths lay their eggs on the plants – neither species can live without the other. Recently, I learned that the Native Americans used yucca (also known as soapweed) for a variety of purposes. The leaves make excellent fibers for weaving, the blossoms can be eaten, but most importantly, the roots can be used for soap.

     Using a variety of how-to articles for a guideline, I set to making my own shampoo. First, I dug up three young plants (which was surprisingly hard even with the sandy ground). Then, I cut off the roots, washed them thoroughly with a stiff brush and began peeling the outer shell. This part took a little while, as my knives were pretty dull :) Once the roots were peeled, I cut them into ice-cube sized pieces and hammered them into a pulp. (I might have gotten a little carried away with the pounding. Good thing we don’t have neighbors, or they might have wondered what the heck I was doing.) Finally, I let the pulp air-dry for a few hours. One website said you can freeze the pulp for storage, or dry it and keep it in a Tupperware. Agitating the dried pulp in water will produce suds. So far I am satisfied with the results – my hair feels clean and it was easy to brush. Maybe after a few days of consistent use, I will give y’all an update :)

     What projects have you all been up to? Tell me in the comments below! Also, if you know of any good dye plants, let me know – I have a lot more fabric to use up!

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natural dyeing
yucca shampoo
yucca shampoo
natural dyeing
(please ignore the crooked edges of this four square! I'm getting better -- doing patchworks by hand is hard!) 

(please ignore the crooked edges of this four square! I'm getting better -- doing patchworks by hand is hard!)